WILD BACTRIAN CAMELS

Camelus bactrianus

ONE OF THE MOST ENDANGERED MAMMALS IN THE WORLD …

Critically endangered, there are thought to be fewer than 1,000 wild bactrian camels remaining. Located in China and Mongolia, the wild bactrian camel is a special species of camel that avoided domestication more than 4,000 years ago.

Yorkshire Wildlife Park is home to the domesticated species of bactrian camel “Camelus ferus”, whose DNA differs by 1.9% to the wild bactrian camel. It is thought that the wild bactrian camel is a completely separate species to the domestic bactrian camel.

The wild bactrian species has suffered a drastic reduction in it’s range, it is now only found in northwest China and the Gobi dessert of southwest Mongolia.

Bactrian Camels Critically Endangered

LESS THAN 1,000 REMAINING!

Affected by: Hunting, Predation &
Habitat Loss

It is estimated that 25-30 wild bactrian camels are being killed every year as they cross the border from the protected “Great Gobi Reserve A” into China. Wild bactrian camels are mainly hunted for local subsistence use.

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WHAT WE’RE DOING!

Yorkshire Wildlife Park Foundation are proud supporters of the Wild Camel Protection Foundation, a charity solely committed to the protection of the wild bactrian camel.

WILD CAMEL RELEASE

Yorkshire Wildlife Park Foundation recently funded a major conservation project where six wild Bactrian Camels were released back into the wild. The Bactrian camels had to be taken across in hospitable terrain to release points at oasis sites 600 and 250 kilometres from their breeding centre near the Mongolia-China border in journeys that took up to 15 hours.

They were transported in trucks, specially adapted to cope with the rugged terrain and, after monitoring, all six trotted off happily into the wild. The British Ambassador to Mongolia, Caroline Arnold, was thrilled to watch the release which was handled by the Wild Camel Protection Fund, in protected areas recognised by the United Nations Environment Programme for the camels’ new homes.

The camels have been fitted with satellite collars so the project can monitor their movements and it is hoped they can provide fresh blood for existing herds. Yorkshire Wildlife Park Foundation, which is supported by the kind donations of visitors to YWP, was instrumental in the carefully co-ordinated release.

It is wonderful to see these animals given a chance and we are proud to be supporting this conservation effort”.

“After a short rest following their journey, the camels trotted off into the surrounding vegetation. It is good to have Mongolian government support and the backing of the British Embassy to save this species from extinction.”Cheryl Williams, YWPF Trustee