BLACK RHINOS

Diceros bicornis

A LIVING FOSSIL, ON THE BRINK …

Once found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, black rhinos are one of the oldest living mammals in the world! Whilst sightings of black rhino were extremely common, the introduction of European settlers obliterated black rhino populations as they hunted them relentlessly.

Between 1970 and 1992, their population declined by 96% to 2,300 from a devastating period of poaching for their horns which are used to make ornamental crowns, cups and ceremonial daggers as well as for herbal medicine. Demand for rhino horn is still rising.

However, thanks to global conservation and anti-poaching efforts since 1992, Black Rhinos numbers have steadily risen to around 5,000 individuals.

Black Rhinos Critically Endangered

96% DECLINE IN TWO DECADES

Affected by: Poaching, Habitat Loss & Civil Unrest

Although black rhino numbers are now on the rise, they are still under significant threat from poaching for the international horn trade.

Rhino horn is mainly used for Chinese medicine and ornamental use. Your donations and support is imperative to stop the poaching of black rhino.

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WHAT WE’RE DOING!

Yorkshire Wildlife Park Foundation are proud supporters of Save the Rhino, a charity committed to conserving rhino species across the world.

ANTI POACHING GRANT

YWPF has funded two key projects that will protect black and white rhino populations across Kenya which are being ruthlessly targeted by poachers. The devastating trade has left many young rhinos orphaned and vulnerable without the protection of their parents.The animals are prized for their horns which are sold in some Asian countries as a medicine.

YWPF funds will support anti-poaching initiatives and fund the construction of the two new enclosures, called bomas, to facilitate care for injured or orphaned rhinos requiring veterinary treatment or hand-rearing. The grants will support security at the Ol Jogi Game Reserve and neighbouring conservation projects against poaching syndicates. A Foundation grant of £9,388 will provide vital funds for a construction of the bomas.

A further grant of £5,000 will aid improvements in Ol Jogi’s communication systems, including digital radios, so staff can keep track of poaching threats. The Foundation schemes were welcomed by Cathy Dean, Save the Rhino International CEO, who described the grants as ‘astonishing’.